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Other Places: Gallerysmith 20 July – 26 August 2017

  • July 10, 2017
Adriane Strampp, Tracing Light, oil on linen, 152 x 152 cm

Adriane Strampp, Tracing Light, oil on linen, 152 x 152 cm

 

Using subtle shifts in tone and hue, Adriane Strampp’s nuanced paintings conjure familiar yet elusive memories of place, emotion and feeling. Her shadowy compositions, built from thin layers of oil and wax on linen, convey a paradox; being at once monumental and intimate, internal and external, familiar and foreign.

View catalogue here.

For all enquiries contact: marita@gallerysmith.com.au | +61 3 9329 1860

GALLERYSMITH
170-174 Abbotsford Street
North Melbourne
VIC 3051
AUSTRALIA

HOURS
TUES-SAT 11 AM – 5 PM

Rosafarben: King Street Gallery on William 26 April – 21 May 2016

  • April 6, 2016

Brume 2016 oil on linen 91 x 274 cm

THE WAY TO ROSAFARBEN

When art critic for New York magazine, Jerry Saltz, saw a reproduction from Adriane Strampp’s recent series of landscapes he wrote that it seemed to him to describe a ‘Metaphysical Highway’.[1] More precisely, since they acknowledge no deity, these works insinuate a circuitous passage: from detailed Victorian dresses, to flowers on textile, to accurate yet unnervingly humanoid animals, eventually arriving at a one-hued, contrived, rather than observed destination that recalls Jean Baudrillard’s notion: ‘the simulation of something that is real by proxy; something which never really existed.’[2] At the same time they counter the postmodern preoccupation with the end of aesthetics.[3]

Running through diverse subject matters is a mastership of her medium—a delicate touch with a tough or tragic commentary—despite their femininity. Among the Victorian ball gowns painted from 1991 to 1998, that are historically a female preoccupation, is a wedding dress without either a bride to wear it or a groom to marry. Complete with finely described bodices and expanded skirts, these dresses stand disarmingly, surveying rolling fields and hedgerows that customarily convey romantic sentiments, but here summon an existential air. Albeit with supreme subtlety, this landscape might just consume them.

A stay in Umbria in 1998 led to the analysis of the Renaissance art seen there.[4] Consequently, conventional composition was disrupted to produce a divided picture comprising details of period clothing, again with an unseen wearer, and close-ups of fabric detail. A not quite hyperreal white hare also takes a prominent role in a re-engineered landscape in which flowers occupy an unnatural position across the canvas. In the next series, enormous flower heads, sometimes without stems, sit lonely and transcendent, as if sensing a painful fate as they sink into the canvas like ash into soil.

In 2011 Strampp was offered a residency with Taronga Zoo. On contracting pleurisy and finding herself too weak to paint, she made finely drawn and gently modelled, almost life-size sketches of its residents, notably the tapirs, focussing on their vulnerability. Again the hare joins them to warily, yet knowingly, observe their viewers. These charcoal drawings, by definition in shades of black and white, were succeeded by landscapes in which subjects are insubstantial, momentarily incandescent and described in monochrome.

It is impossible, given the inclusion of road and tree-like imagery in the Rosafarben (pink) paintings, to read them other than as depictions of journeys and landscapes, and there is in fact an autobiographical impulse in a 2012 return to her birthplace in Wisconsin, USA, when Strampp reacquainted herself with its local forest trees.[5] But to define these works as pure landscape is to locate them in the terrestrial and thereby limit their scope. The Wisconsin scenes were remembered indistinctly and were not exactly as they had once been; as they were seen through from a car window they were not perceived clearly a second time around.[6] Everything about these works is at least once removed; there is a familiarity, but it is an insecure recollection. Sometimes there is a step back, such as in the use of the German word ‘vorbeigehen’ (to pass by) for a series title, so as to create a distance between the work and the viewer, suggesting at once a cloudy impression of autobiography—in that Strampp has German ancestors—and long gone landscape standards such as those in work by Constable and Turner.

Painterliness is as important as the narrative stimulus from which it arises. Aqueous pigment is allowed to run freely allowing chance to take fleeting compositional control while images appear and disappear as mists and reflections. With the use of wax and delicate washes images dissolve and at the same time disconnect, so reflecting Strampp’s own peripatetic childhood that due to constant upheaval, was experienced as separation, transience and loss.

In the Rosafarben works, the Australian, harsh-continent landscape model is contradicted, suggesting the watercolour rather than the oil tradition, while positing an emotional, yet powerful reinterpretation of it as female.

© Traudi Allen 17 March 2016

Dr. Traudi Allen is a writer and art historian and an Adjunct Fellow with the National Centre for Australian Studies at Monash University. She has recently published John Perceval: Art and Life (MUP).

  1. Saltz, Jerry, Instagram, 30 Dec. 2015
  2. Fleming, John and Honour, Hugh The Visual Arts: A History, 3rd. Edition. Harry N. Abrams, Inc. New York, 1991. p. 680-7.
  3. Described by Frederic Jameson as ‘a culture of degraded landscape of schlock and kitsch’, Jameson, ‘Postmodernism, or the cultural logic of late Capitalism’, New Left Review 1984, p. 65, 55 in Contemporary Cultural Theory, Milner, Andrew, p.107.
  4. Email communication between Adriane Strampp and Traudi Allen, 5 March 2016.
  5. Traudi Allen interview with Adriane Strampp, studio, 236 Brunswick Street, Fitzroy, 26 February 2016.
  6. Ibid.

View PDF catalogue here or on Issu.com here.

For all enquiries contact: art@kingstreetgallery.com | +61 2 9360 9727

KING STREET GALLERY ON WILLIAM
177 William St, Darlinghurst
NSW 2010 AUSTRALIA

HOURS:

10am – 6pm Tuesday – Saturday
11am – 6pm Sunday

The Landscape Remembered: Jan Manton 9 September – 3 October

  • September 15, 2015

strampp-adriane-Macedon

Transition 2015 oil on linen 152 x 152 cm

This new work by Adriane Strampp continues to explore the remembered landscape; fragmented views of journeys made reflecting Strampp’s own peripatetic upbringing and sense of dislocation. It reflects upon the passage of time, absence, memory and loss, portrayed in largely monochromatic, improbable colour. The work posits our own tendency to colour our memories and reflections.

As Strampp describes a sense of transience and motion when there is no final destination, we are taken along for the ride, fleeting glimpses of the passing landscape that give us non-specific views that nevertheless involve a sense of familiarity. It is the movement, the lack of connection that concerns her, rather than the traditional art historical landscape. Occasional reflections are placed across works such as Rise 2015, deliberate visual barriers, so separating the viewer from the landscape, transforming them instead into an objective observer. As with her earlier work, subtle visual barriers at odds with the image are frequently employed as a means of creating uncertainty and unrest.

Strampp’s surface is a time-consuming construction involving the use of wax and delicate colour washes that depict the hazy, ephemeral and elusive nature of memory. As paint is allowed to run and dissolve there is a melancholic sense of transience and at the same time, in keeping with the notion of fleeting memory, other areas are painted in detail. The strong hues are used for their capacity to elicit emotional responses, as well as to capture the subjective nature of memory.

Download catalogue here.

For all enquiries please contact jan@janmantonart.com | +61 7 3831 3060

JAN MANTON ART
1/93 Fortescue St Spring Hill
QLD 4000 AUSTRALIA

HOURS
WED-FRI by appointment only
SAT 10am-4pm

www.janmanton.com

Vorbeigehen: Fort Delta 30 April – 9 May

  • April 19, 2015

strampp_adriane_morgen 2015

Morgen 2015 oil and wax on linen 50 x 50 cm

In 2012, Adriane Strampp re-visited a northern part of the USA, just above the Great Lakes, where she had spent a portion of her childhood. From the car she was travelling in, Strampp photo-documented the nine-hour road trip to her past. Out of the hundreds of photo that she took from first light through to dusk, Strampp selected only a few to use as structures to diverge from and create the works that form Vorbeigehen.

Vorbeigehen is an exhibition series of faintly painted and distanced landscapes. Some large in scale, surrounding and enveloping us in their eminence, others are smaller and dense in shadow. In these paintings, the focus is not on the landscape itself but rather on our deeper, ephemeral relationship with memory and the experience, anticipation, and expectations of revisiting a place once loved. The visually immersive paintings attempt to materialise intangible, visceral experiences that bleed into hallucinations of memory and imagination.

In this regard, Strampp’s work has a strong correlation to the writing of Susan Sontag. In her 2003 book, Regarding The Pain of Others, Sontag observed that memory alters an image according to its need to confer an emblematic status on things we feel worthy of remembering. One may feel shame, fear, anxiety, sadness or loss upon remembering a past and it’s associated vernacular or ‘landscape’ of imagery we remember it by.

Download catalogue here.

For all enquiries please contact james@fortdelta.com.au  | T.   +61 [3] 8804 0888

FORT DELTA ART GALLERY
Shop 59, Capitol Arcade (Basement Level). 113 Swanston Street
Melbourne CBD, 3000
Enter via Howey Place.

HOURS: Tues – Sat 11am – 5pm

fortdelta.com.au

 

Passages of Time: Hill Smith Gallery 27 April – 20 May

  • April 28, 2012


Brume 2012 oil on linen 152 x 152 cm

 

Hill Smith Gallery

113 Pirie Street

Adelaide

South Australia 5000

 

 

Tuesday-Saturday 10am-5.30pm

Sunday 2-5pm

 

 

 

Passages of Time is Adriane Strampp’s first exhibition in Adelaide since 1999, and is an overview of recent work. It includes paintings from both the horse and landscape series as well as several drawings.

Strampp’s new work continues to explore the poetic and the romantic, whilst at the same time referencing elements of her earlier work. Over the last six years Strampp has reduced her palette to quiet greys built of many thin washes of colour, creating a sense of stillness and shadow, reinforcing her interest in both spatial relationships, surface materiality and the presence of absence.

As a result her landscapes have become ethereal and ambiguous, their haziness leaves the viewer uncertain of what they are seeing – trees in the mist or shadows suspended in particles of light, they appear familiar but not specific. The statues refer to her early and popular dress series, weathered and sometimes damaged they remain strong and heroic, a contemplation of mortality and fallen ideals. The animals she chooses to draw and paint are often vulnerable, yet they too carry a stoic, if guarded strength.

There is a sense of timelessness in this new work, and a sense of maturation as Strampp attempts to address the importance of connection and communication through her work.

Istoria: King Street Gallery 6 – 31 March 2012

  • March 3, 2012

Nike 2012

King Street Gallery
on William
177 William St
Darlinghurst
NSW 2010

10am – 6pm Tuesday – Saturday
Opening March 7, 6-8pm

Istoria

In this new exhibition Strampp continues to work with a limited palette, focusing on the ambiguities of spatial perception, history and connection.

Included in this exhibition are two works referencing Strampp’s early dress series. The landscapes have developed a deeper space than previous work, whilst the animals within, (a result of a residency at Taronga Zoo in 2011) hold their own, survivors of a rapidly changing landscape.

This exhibition also includes a new series of smaller works, Memorium, that further explore spatial relationships and connection through surface materiality, with the use of paint, wax, paper, mirror and lead.

Image: Nike 2012 oil on linen 152 x 152 cm

Further images available here and here.

Erlösung: The Animal Gaze, dianne tanzer gallery + projects 2 – 23 April 2011

  • April 3, 2011

Dianne Tanzer Gallery + Projects 2 – 23 April 2011
108 – 110 Gertrude Street Fitzroy VIC 3065

Opening hours:
Mon – Fri 10am – 5pm
Sat 12pm – 5pm

Tapirus indicus 2011

Adriane Strampp Tapirus indicus charcoal on Fabriano paper
105 x 225 cm

Choeropsis liberiensis 2011

Adriane Strampp Choeropsis liberiensis 2011 charcoal on Fabriano paper 105 x 225 cm

Geochelone gigantea 2011

Adriane Strampp Geochelone gigantea 2011 charcoal on Fabriano paper
105 x 150 cm

Hares, horses and stags have long featured in Strampp’s work, images of the hunted and the haunted, symbols of both strength and vulnerability. In conjunction with Strampp’s 2011 residency at Sydney’s Taronga Zoo, Erlösung: The Animal Gaze is a project drawing exhibition that considers the animal gaze, and the relationship between the observer and the observed.

The animals in this exhibition are not cute; rather they are solid, monumental creatures drawn life-size, yet paradoxically they remain fragile and exposed. Their wary gaze regards us, guarded and measured, and they remain ‘in absentia’. In our desire for connection we long for our gaze to be returned, but as they look through or past us our projections are mirrored back, only to remind us of our imposition on their world.

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