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Five Miles from the Sea, Victoria University 19 April – 13 May 2011

Artspace
Level 17
Victoria University
Melbourne 3000

Five Miles from the Sea is a group show curated by Geoff Tolchard.

Five Miles from the Sea is a look at the incursion (Five miles from the Sea) of non-indigenous Australians and their resulting mark on the land. Whether it is the erosion of the land or the erosion of the quarter acre block, how are we shaping and living in the hinterland? Who lives five miles from the sea? What does it look like though the eyes of ten diverse artists, some from different parts of the globe, who have indeed made Australia their home?

adriane-strampp-hare-II-2010
Hare II 2010
charcoal on Arches paper 76 x 56 cm

Adriane Strampp : Artist Statement

In considering the impact of European settlement in Australia, one of the most invasive and damaging migrants (other than European man), is the rabbit.

Although originally arriving with the First Fleet in1788, it was Thomas Austin, formerly of Somerset, who is held historically responsible for the spread of rabbits when he released 24 rabbits and 5 hares at his property Barwon Park, near Geelong in 1859.

A lack of predators and mild winters provided an ideal climate for year-round breeding and by the 1900’s the feral rabbit population had reached plague proportions across Australia. Despite the rabbits’ devastating impact on native flora and the environment, the introduction of foxes as a remedy only worsened the situation as the foxes found indigenous birds and marsupials easier prey. In 1907 the infamous rabbit-proof fence was built in WA, a futile attempt to control the spread of rabbits, and later in 1950 Myxomatosis was introduced, causing a slow and painful death that ultimately the rabbits became immune to.

In 1863 the Acclimatisation Society of Victoria set up on Phillip Island a breeding colony for hares sent from London by the Zoological Society. Although introduced at the same time as rabbits, hares had less of an impact on the environment being slower to breed and non-burrowing, and their spread was limited to the more temperate climate of South-Eastern Australia.

This work is from a series of recent drawings titled The Animal Gaze, examining the fragile relationship between animals and the human race. The hare stares back at the viewer, a symbol of strength and vulnerability, segregation and marginalisation. We are both migrants to this land and the animal gaze serves to remind us equally of our imposition on their world.

The Victorian Acclimatisation Society was founded in 1861 in order to introduce European plants and animals in order to make the alien environment economically productive, and to feel more like home. It folded 11 years later as the extent their damage was realised. (Source: Museum Victoria)

Kedumba Drawing Award 31 October – 30 November 2010

Hare (In memory of Marcus)
Adriane Strampp Hare (In memory of Marcus) charcoal, pencil and graphite on Arches paper 76 x 56 cm
Adriane Strampp’s work Hare (In memory of Marcus) 2010 has been acquired for the Kedumba Collection of Contemporary Australian Drawings.

Adriane Stampp
19. Hare (In memory of Marcus)

“An iconic, enigmatic work that reminds me of the enquiry that Durer was capable of. The artist placed the hare in a believable space without rendering a background. Placing all the importance on the animal itself.”

Speech by Peter Sharp
Judge of the Kedumba Drawing Award 2010

Blue Mountains Grammar School,
Wentworth Falls,
NSW

31 October – 30 November 2010

John Leslie Art Prize 2 October – 14 November 2010

Adriane Strampp is among the 31 finalists for this year’s John Leslie Art Prize 1 October 2010 with her painting Grey Garden oil on linen 152 x 152 cm.

The Vision Splendid – Beauty in the Natural World
John Leslie Art Prize,
Gippsland Art Gallery,
Sale,
VIC

2 October – 14 November 2010

Kedumba Drawing Award 31 October – 30 November 2010

Adriane Strampp Tsuki 2010
Adriane Strampp Tsuki Charcoal, pencil and graphite on paper 76 x 56 cm 2010
Adriane Strampp Hare 2010
Adriane Strampp Hare Charcoal, pencil and graphite on paper 76 x 56 cm 2010

Adriane Strampp has been invited to enter this year’s Kedumba Drawing Award.

Blue Mountains Grammar School, Wentworth Falls, NSW
31 October – 30 November 2010

‘The Kedumba Collection has become the most representative collection of drawings of this period in this country.’

John Olsen AO OBE

Painthing (as one): AEAF 16 April – 5 May 2010

Equus
Adriane Strampp Equus 2008 oil on cotton paper 100x490 cm
Australian Experimental Art Foundation
Lion Arts Centre, North Tce [West End] Adelaide South Australia
Tuesday – Friday 11am-5pm
Saturday 2-5pm

Artists have been invited to respond to seven considerations regarding the compelling nature of painting. The title refers to the whole of this exhibition as constituting a discreet body of ‘painting’, one that might inclusively construct, amongst other things, a local constellation. This constellation might then be referred to as ‘painting’, and be located within a local universe called ‘art’; in time this constellation might become known, but probably only to its very particular inhabitants, as the ‘painthing constellation’.

Painting. Painting, pain thing: painthing. Maybe this has happened to you too; you’re driving along a suburban street or you’re reading the label on the back of a tin of crushed tomatoes somewhere in a dim corner of a supermarket and suddenly a word, actually any word but this time it’s this word, gets caught on the sieve-like structure that divides your perception of ordinary action from an extraordinary something. Immediately the word as-it-is jumps out at you and you see it in its entire absurdity, its un-meaning, its limp body superimposed on the frenetic buzziness of the universal attraction and repulsion going on all around you. Then you begin to examine it, prod it for signs of its former life. Nothing. Something very surprising suddenly happens; its body becomes slowly absorbed into the phrenesis of action and reaction, memory and meaning, membrane and pulsing core. It continues to offer itself to this whole until the shape you once knew emerges elsewhere as another; different, but somehow the same. And then you try and understand (what else can you do, you’re stuck in a long check-out queue) how this word-—this painful thing actually—can simultaneously be both itself and other. You look around; people are still in the queue, shelves still stacked, fluoros still buzzing, cars still silently gliding by outside, tired smiles still being offered. And then you realize that almost everything (you think almost because somehow you feel it cannot be quite this absolute) is both itself and some other thing; inalienably itself, yet distantly other. Is a constellation like that? Are the celestial bodies and dust particles that form it simply an infinite collection of collections of otherness, each component offering a kaleidoscopic fragment of the whole, yet each simultaneously desiring both breathless proximity and vast expansive space in which to, utterly and defiantly, be that one thing it feels itself to be? And, what of breathless proximity? Ah, that, the as one-ness thing. I can’t speak of that. It’s not in my nature, I resolutely surmise, as I get to the check-out just in time.

Domenico de Clario, AEAF director

Sulman Prize Art Gallery of NSW 27 March – 30 May 2010

The Crossing
Adriane Strampp The Crossing 2009 oil on canvas 92x92cm

Art Gallery NSW: Archibald, Wynne and Sulman Prizes
27 March – 30 May 2010

Adriane Strampp’s work The Crossing was selected as one of finalists for the prestigious Sulman Prize at the Art Gallery of NSW. The judge for the Sulman Prize changes each year and for 2010 was the artist Imants Tillers.

This is the fourth time that Adriane has been a finalist, the previous years being 2006, 2003 and 1996.

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